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New Punk Cinema$
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Nicholas Rombes

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780748620340

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620340.001.0001

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Sincerity and Irony

Sincerity and Irony

Chapter:
(p.72) Sincerity and Irony
Source:
New Punk Cinema
Author(s):

Nicholas Rombes

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620340.003.0005

This chapter discusses the sincerity and irony in new punk cinema. New punk cinema developed during a time when irony became a mainstay in popular culture in the 1970s. As such, the moments of intense emotion and melodrama in key films, Magnolia, The Idiots, Breaking the Waves, Fight Club and the Blair Witch Project can be read through conflicting registers that blur the boundaries of sincerity, irony and camp. The uneasy and contradictory codes of new punk cinema are also part of a broader trend that extends beyond cinema and into television, literature and the web.

Keywords:   new punk cinema, sincerity, irony, popular culture

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