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Word And Image In Ancient Greece$
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N. Keith Rutter and Brian Sparkes

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780748614066

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748614066.001.0001

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Losing the Picture: Change and Continuity in Athenian Grave Monuments in the Fourth and Third Centuries bc

Losing the Picture: Change and Continuity in Athenian Grave Monuments in the Fourth and Third Centuries bc

Chapter:
(p.206) 11 Losing the Picture: Change and Continuity in Athenian Grave Monuments in the Fourth and Third Centuries BC
Source:
Word And Image In Ancient Greece
Author(s):

Karen Stears

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748614066.003.0012

Athens produced some of the finest sculpted grave monuments to be found in the ancient world, which adorned cemeteries and roadsides throughout the polis. The majority of them were decorated with painted images of the deceased, their family identified by the addition of an inscribed or painted name or epigram. This chapter investigates other aspects of the concepts of ‘text’ and ‘art’, and indeed of ‘reading’ and ‘viewing’ within the funerary context of Athens. It argues that monuments should be regarded in a ‘holistic’ manner, and also focuses on the classical era's thriving sculpture industry, with a market eager for gravestones. Moreover, the chapter considers the implications of the change in memorial form in an attempt to assess the impact of the loss of the figurative grave-markers and the intrusion of a purely inscribed monument on Athenian funerals.

Keywords:   Athens, grave, monuments, cemeteries, polis, images, epigram, text, art, funerals

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