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Everyday Life in Ancient Mesopotamia$
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Jean Bottero

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780748613878

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748613878.001.0001

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Semiramis: The Builder of Babylon

Semiramis: The Builder of Babylon

Chapter:
(p.141) Chapter 9 Semiramis: The Builder of Babylon
Source:
Everyday Life in Ancient Mesopotamia
Author(s):

Georges Roux

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748613878.003.0009

At the end of the nineteenth century, the texts originating from excavations in Mesopotamia taught the real history of that country, and it was then that Assyriologists and historians began to ask themselves questions. What did the legend conceal? Had Semiramis existed and, if so, how and why had a woman, even if a queen, acquired such importance in the minds of the ancients that she ended by personifying, on her own, all the power and glory of an empire built by a long line of male and virile kings? No one can approach this question without first poring over the legend of Semiramis as it is found in the second book of the Bibliotheca historica of Diodorus of Sicily, a Greek writer of the first century BC.

Keywords:   excavations, Mesopotamia, Semiramis, woman, queen, empire, Bibliotheca historica, Diodorus

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