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Everyday Life in Ancient Mesopotamia$
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Jean Bottero

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780748613878

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748613878.001.0001

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The Women of the Palace at Mari

The Women of the Palace at Mari

Chapter:
(p.127) Chapter 8 The Women of the Palace at Mari
Source:
Everyday Life in Ancient Mesopotamia
Author(s):

Bertrand Lafont

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748613878.003.0008

The evidence discovered at Tell Hariri presents an interesting special feature; it contains a number of texts relating to the female population of the kingdom, notably many letters from women who, because of their birth or duties, sometimes played an important role at the court of Mari or in affairs of state. These letters have been assembled under the title ‘female correspondence’, among them missives exchanged between the king Zimri-Lim and the queen Shiptu when the sovereign was away, as well as letters from the secondary wives, the king's daughters, priestesses and other high-ranking women. A dossier was discovered made up of exceptional documents that throw a vivid light on the situation of women in the kingdom, especially the great ladies of the palace.

Keywords:   Tell Hariri, female, population, letters, Mari, correspondence, Zimri-Lim, Shiptu, kingdom, palace

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