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Rome in Late AntiquityEveryday Life and Urban Change, AD 312-609$
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Bertrand Lancon

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780748612390

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748612390.001.0001

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Introduction: The city between antiquity and the Middle Ages Mark Humphries

Introduction: The city between antiquity and the Middle Ages Mark Humphries

Chapter:
(p.xvi) Introduction: The city between antiquity and the Middle Ages Mark Humphries
Source:
Rome in Late Antiquity
Author(s):

Bertrand Lançon

Antonia Nevill

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748612390.003.0001

This book provides an account of how, between the conversion to Christianity of the emperor Constantine in 312 and the pontificate of Pope Gregory the Great, Rome was transformed from the capital of the classical Roman empire to the centre of medieval Christendom. Perhaps the most striking manifestation of this change is offered by the city's topography, where the churches came to dominate where once there had been pagan temples and imperial monuments. In this respect, the book presents a more wide-ranging analysis of Rome's metamorphosis. The focus is as much on the everyday lives of the city's ordinary inhabitants as on the achievements of emperors, popes and aristocrats, and the book sets architectural changes side by side with those in society, institutions and the economy.

Keywords:   conversion, Christianity, Constantine, pontificate, Gregory the Great, Rome, Christendom, topography, metamorphosis

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