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A Short History of the IsmailisTraditions of a Muslim Community$
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Farhad Daftary

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780748609048

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748609048.001.0001

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Later Developments: Continuity and Modernisation

Later Developments: Continuity and Modernisation

Chapter:
(p.159) 5 Later Developments: Continuity and Modernisation
Source:
A Short History of the Ismailis
Author(s):

Farhad Daftary

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748609048.003.0005

This chapter investigates the main developments in both Nizārī and Musta‘lian branches of Ismailism from the middle of the 7th/13th century until the present time. On the Nizārīs, the chapter focuses on their taqiyya or dissimulating practices under Sufi, Sunni and Twelver Shi‘i guises, that helped to safeguard the Nizārīs from rampant persecution in Iran, Central Asia and elsewhere. Covering the Anjudān revival in Nizārī da‘wa and literary activities, the chapter shows how this revival was particularly successful in South Asia where the Nizārīs became known as Khojas with their distinct Satpanth tradition and ginān literature. The chapter also covers the modern period in Nizārī history under the progressive guidance of their imams known as the Aga Khans. A section is devoted to the modern history of the Musta‘lian Ṭayyibī Ismailis who split into Dā’ūdī and Sulaymānī branches and became known in South Asia as the Bohras.

Keywords:   Aga Khan, Anjudān, Khojas, ginān, Satpanth, Bohras

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